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Is it safe to use Copaiba oil for Dogs?

Is Copaiba essential oil safe for dogs?

The most important issue comes right at the start: Don´t give the Copaiba essential Oil of an oral dose to your dog! What is being called a new trend can be fatal for your dog. Of course there many essential oils that are used in the art of aromatherapy for dogs and pets but these Oils are usually studied precisely. Some of these oils are lavender, balm and camomile or eucalyptus. But for now, there is no – absolutely no – clinical study by an independent laboratory that taking the Copaiba essential Oil ingredient orally with dogs.

It could be possible that some “studies” are uploaded or published about Copaiba essential Oil in conjunction with Dogs but mostly these are inhouse studies by large concerns. There is an old and true german saying: “Don’t ever trust studies that you haven’t falsified yourself”. To say this plainly: Stay away from the essential oil by using orally to Dog´s. For external use you can like try it out experimental!

Much safer: Raw Copaiba Oil for Dogs

Surely a few of Copaiba resellers or MLM companies will wrinkle up the powdered nose, but its a fact that raw Copaiba Oil was analysing and has been studied of truly independent laboratories or universities. The results of the study’s cannot transferring one-to-one to the essential Oil. In response to the puplic studies, analyses and based on current information it can be said, that only the pure Copaiba Oil is more safe for Dogs.

Source 1: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
Use of β-caryophyllene to combat bacterial dental plaque formation in dogs.

Source 2: http://www.scielo.br/
Endodontics pastes formulated with copaiba oil: action on oral microbiota and dentin bridge formation in dogs.

Source 3: http://www.scielo.br/
The oleoresin from C. reticulata showed high activity against S. aureus multidrug resistant (MIC = 2.5 µg/mL) and S. aureus ATCC strains (MIC = 5.0 µg/mL). Pieri et al. showed the ability of the C. officinalis oleoresin to inhibit bacterial adhesion in dog’s teeth by clinical and microbiological trials.

Source 4: http://www.scielo.br/
The oleoresin from C. reticulata showed high activity against S. aureus multidrug resistant (MIC = 2.5 µg/mL) and S. aureus ATCC strains (MIC = 5.0 µg/mL). Pieri et al. showed the ability of the C. officinalis oleoresin to inhibit bacterial adhesion in dog’s teeth by clinical and microbiological trials.

Source 5: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Genotoxicity assessment of Copaiba oil and its fractions in Swiss mice

Acute oral toxicity test

In a study with Swiss albino mouse (Mus musculus), weighing 20 to 30 g, received a dose of 2000 mg/kg raw Copaiba Oil and were observed for 48 h. If the animal survived, the other 4 animals were sequentially tested with the same dose. The survival of 3 or more animals qualifies as the LD50 greater than 2000 mg/kg which results a low toxicity

On the acute oral toxicity test, none of the animals tested with the limit dose (2000 mg/kg/day) died or had any sign or symptom of toxicity during the 48-h test. Thus, the dose prescribed for this study was 10% of the limit dose and the copaiba oil-resin group of animals received 200 mg/kg/day and the control animals received 200 mL/kg/day of Tween 20.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

Summary of Side-Effects

We could, theoretically, also produce the Copaiba essential Oil – That is absolutely no problem – but there is no reason to do that. The pure and raw Copaiba Oil is used for hundred of years and is used and tested in veterinary medicine of south america, as a substitute for antibiotics well as for local inflammation. This is why we must now honour and trust the Nature and the long experience of South American veterinarians, therapists and particularly the indigenous peoples. Then, the raw oil can be used safely on all species (dilute for dogs, cats, and small animals, reptile and birds.)

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